Wednesday, November 7, 2012 - , , 0 comments

Mughals in India (Very Important)

Mughals in India

And The Winner Is…!


(Article originally posted on BookAdda blog )
And The Winner Is…!
By RIDHI MALHOTRA

This literary award season was officially launched with the declaring of Chinese author Mo Yan as the winner of Nobel Prize for Literature. At BOOKADDA, we’ve reviewed the literary award winners of 2012. The creative works have been judged the best of their kind. What is your take on their win? Tell us in the comments!
1. The 2012 Man Booker PrizeThe winner of the Man Booker Prize is chosen from a shortlist of six books authored by a citizen of the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland. Each of the six shortlisted writers is awarded £2,500 and a specially commissioned beautifully hand-bound edition of his/her book. The winner receives £50,000. The judges took nine months to come to a conclusion. This definitely wasn’t easy. The scrutiny involved hard work, reading and re-reading of books at least three times by the judges and waiting for public’s verdict on their choice.
Universal praise from critics and reading public made Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel the winner of Man Booker Prize 2012. This award made Hilary Mantel the third author to win the award twice, and the first to win it with a sequel.

Parliament of various countries

Parliaments of various countries
Parliaments
COUNTRY -PARLIAMENT


Afghanistan - Shora
Andorra - General Council
Albania - People's Assembly
Azerbaijan - Melli Majlis
Algeria - National People's Assembly
Angola - National People's Assembly
Argentina- National Congress
Australia - Federal Parliament
Austria - National Assembly
Bahamas - General Assembly
Bahrain- Consultative Council
Bangladesh -Jatiya Sansad
Belize - National Assembly
Bhutan - Tsogdu
Bolivia - National Congress
Brazil - National Congress
Brunei - National Assembly
Botswana - National Assembly
Britain - Parliment (House of Common's and House of Lords)
Bulgaria - Narodno Subranie.
Cambodia - National Assembly

Congo Democratic - Rep. of National Legislative Council
Colombia - Congress
Canada - Parliament
China - National People's Assembly
Chile -Chamber of Deputies and Senate
Comoros -Legislative Council and Senate

Costa Rice - Legislative Council and Senate
Crotia - Sabor
Cuba - National Assembly of People's Power
Czech Republic - Chamber of Deputies and Senate
Denmark - Folketing
Ecuador - Natinal Congress
El Salvador - Legislative Assembly
East Timor - Constituent Assembly
Ethiopia - Federal Council and House of Representative
Egypt - People's Assembly
Fiji Islands -Senate & House of Representative
France - National Assembly
Finland - Eduskusta (Parliament)
Germany - Bundestag (Lower House) and Bundesrat (Upper House)
Guyana - National Assembly
Greece - Chamber of Deputies
Hungry - National Assembly
Iceland - Althing
India - Sansad
Indonesia - People's Consultative Assembly
Iran - Majlis
Iraq - National Assembly
Israel- Knesset
Italy -Chamber of Deputies and Senate
Japan - Diet
Jordan - National Assembly
Korea(North) - Supreme People's Assembly
Korea(South) - National Assembly
Kuwait - National Assembly
Laos - People's Supreme Assembly
Lebanon - National Assembly
Lesotho - National Assembly and Senate
Lithuania - Seimas
Luxembourg - Chamber of Deputies
Libya - General People's Congress
Malaysia - Dewan Rakyat and Dewan Negara
Maldives - Majlis
Madagascar - National People's Assembly
Mongolia - Great People's Khural
Montenegro - Federal Assembly
Mozambique - People's Assembly
Myanmar - Pyithu Hluttaw
Nepal - Rashtriya Panchayat
Netherlands - The Staten General
New Zealand - Parliament (House of Representative)
Oman - Monarchy
Pakistan - National Assembly & Senate
Paraguay - Senate & Chamber of Deputies
Philippines - The Congress
Papua New Guinea - National Parliament
Poland - Sejm
Romania - Great National Assembly
Russia - Duma & Federal Council
Serbia - Federal Assembly
Senegal - National Assembly
Seychelles - People's Assembly
South Africa - Rep. House of Assembly
Spain - Cortes
Sweden - Riksdag
Saudi Arabia - Majlis Al Shura
Sudan - Majlis Watani
Switzerland - Federal Assembly
Syria - People's Council
Turkey - Grand National Assembly
USA - Congress
Vietnam - National Assembly
Venezuela - National Congress
Zambia - National Assembly
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Is Chocolate Good for Your Heart?


Why a little, in moderation, may be beneficial
Chocolate has gotten a lot of media coverage in recent years because it's believed that it may help protect your cardiovascular system. The reasoning being that the cocoa bean is rich in a class of plant nutrients called flavonoids.

Flavonoids help protect plants from environmental toxins and help repair damage. They can be found in a variety of foods, such as fruits and vegetables. When we eat foods rich in flavonoids, it appears that we also benefit from this "antioxidant" power.

Antioxidants are believed to help the body's cells resist damage caused by free radicals that are formed by normal bodily processes, such as breathing, and from environmental contaminants, like cigarette smoke. If your body does not have enough antioxidants to combat the amount of oxidation that occurs, it can become damaged by free radicals. For example, an increase in oxidation can cause low-density lipoprotein (LDL), also known as "bad" cholesterol, to form plaque on the artery walls.

Flavanols are the main type of flavonoid found in cocoa and chocolate. In addition to having antioxidant qualities, research shows that flavanols have other potential influences on vascular health, such as lowering blood pressure, improving blood flow to the brain and heart, and making blood platelets less sticky and able to clot.

These plant chemicals aren’t only found in chocolate. In fact, a wide variety of foods and beverages are rich in flavonols. These include cranberries, apples, peanuts, onions, tea and red wine.

Are all types of chocolate healthy?
Before you grab a chocolate candy bar or slice of chocolate cake, it’s important to understand that not all forms of chocolate contain high levels of flavanols.

Cocoa naturally has a very strong, pungent taste, which comes from the flavanols. When cocoa is processed into your favorite chocolate products, it goes through several steps to reduce this taste. The more chocolate is processed (through things like fermentation, alkalizing, roasting, etc.), the more flavanols are lost.

What about all of the fat in chocolate?
You may be surprised to learn that chocolate isn’t as bad for you as once believed.

The fat in chocolate comes from cocoa butter and is made up of equal amounts of oleic acid (a heart-healthy monounsaturated fat also found in olive oil), stearic and palmitic acids. Stearic and palmitic acids are forms of saturated fat. You may know that saturated fats are linked to increases in LDL cholesterol and the risk of heart disease.

But, research shows that stearic acid appears to have a neutral effect on cholesterol, neither raising nor lowering it. Although palmitic acid does affect cholesterol levels, it only makes up one-third of the fat calories in chocolate. Still, this does not mean you can eat all the dark chocolate you’d like.